Notes from Toronto

I had the distinct pleasure several weeks ago of visiting the lovely city of Toronto for a wedding.

Toronto is wildly diverse, and integrated in a way I’ve not seen before in North America. This isn’t to say there was nothing resembling a Chinatown – there certainly was – but even within that, not every restaurant or shop was Chinese, nor were there none anywhere else. Naturally, I looked up the official demographics. As of 2011, the city was:

  • 50% white
  • 13% East Asian
  • 12% South Asian
  • 9% black
  • 7% Southeast Asian
  • 3% Latin Canadian
  • 6% other

And it feels like it! Cantonese grocery stores border Vietnamese pho bars next to West Indian restaurants. This kind of integration seems all too rare in balkanized America. But it’s wonderful to see in person. Moving west from Spadina we also wandered through Kensington Market, a wildly hip area home to everything from head shops to cocktail bars to garden stores to bagelries (and most, if not all, with apartments or other housing above). There were also a number of pot dispensaries, but most seemed closed, perhaps due to Mayor John Tory’s crackdown. Given the narrow streets and miniscule sidewalks, I was actually surprised that the area was open to vehicle traffic, but it seemed most drivers felt the same and we had to dodge very few cars.

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We also explored the properly pedestrianized Distillery District – sadly home to not so many distilleries, but among other things, to a proper sake brewery. The old brick warehouses and industrial facilities – coupled with the wharves being redeveloped – reminded me of a DC Navy Yard, only with a bit more soul (a bit).

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I can’t help but guess that at least some portion of this is owed to Toronto’s wonderful walkability – while it suffers from some of the same wide boulevard problems as US cities, waiting to cross the street never seemed to take too long and the light rail, especially on Spadina, made for a natural pedestrian refuge.

But let’s talk transit. From Pearson International Airport, the Union-Pearson (UP) Express takes you to Toronto’s downtown Union Station in about 25 minutes, with only two intervening stops. I was reminded very much of Heathrow Express in terms of the seating and luggage arrangement, and minor as it is, the luggage rack had an ingenious holding bar that swung up, so you didn’t have to lift a heavy bag over it (apologies for the lack of UP Express photos).

I believe this was the first diesel multiple unit (DMU) I’ve ridden, and the ride was smooth and fast into Union Station. This is a worthy express train, especially given the current fares of 12 CAD, rather than the 25 it charged when it first opened. We had just missed a train, but fortunately, the next one was 15 minutes away, and arrived in 10 so we were able to take our seats well before it departed. However, when returning to the airport, we had a 7:30am flight, and given the pre-clearance US customs, potential security lines, and other travails of modern air travel, a 5:30 opening for the UP Express didn’t seem quite early enough, so we took an Uber instead. We probably would have been okay with the train, especially seeing how close it was to us, but settled for piece of mind and a higher fare.

I know local Torontonians loathe the streetcars. But maybe it was their charm, or the fact that I was visiting over a holiday weekend (Victoria Day) – I enjoyed them thoroughly. For the most part, frequency was as good as I’d hoped it might be. The longest wait was about six minutes, except for the one time we gave up as the next streetcar was more than ten minutes away.

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Even though new mixed-traffed streetcars tend to be an awful idea, I understand a little better why the simple rail > bus argument can work in their favor. I can imagine gridlock paralysis during peak workday hours, but compared with a bus, the ride was remarkably smooth, the routes fairly clear, and the experience immeasurably better. It helps, too, that Toronto has accompanied the rollout of the Presto farecard with all-door boarding.

However, we did encounter one of the downsides to fixed guideway, mixed traffic transit. On King St. approaching Bathurst, our streetcar suddenly glided to a halt, and the driver announced that we’d lost power. He deboarded and looked towards the intersection and radioed in, only to be informed that a streetcar on the other side of the intersection had caught fire around the bogie, and so they’d cut the power to the last few hundred feet of all the catenaries approaching the intersection. We got off and walked, where we could see streetcars backing up in all directions:

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We also took a closer look at the affected streetcar, which had already been liberally fire-extinguished:

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After a brisk walk, we were able to find a cab and continue on.

However, getting a Presto card proved rather more difficult than anticipated. Based on numerous TTC personnel asked, the only place to get one (as opposed to using tokens) was at Union Station itself. Luckily, we were staying nearby, but even then it took almost 20 minutes of wandering the underground corridors and passages, seemingly through construction sites and abandoned rooms, until I found the GO Transit desk where I could get a pair of cards. Once we had them, though, they worked quite well across subway, streetcar, and light rail.

Speaking of the subway, Toronto’s seemed impressive, at least for off-peak travel. We were there on a holiday weekend and probably took half a dozen or eight rides (all on the Yonge-University Line); not once did we even wait long enough to look around the platform for a next train display (if I hadn’t looked up this, I wouldn’t have known they even had them). The Toronto Rocket, as the new Bombardier railcars are known, is open-gangway and has ample standing room.

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Given the peak hour crush, this is a necessity, but now that Toronto’s committed to the Downtown Relief Line, hopefully that will be alleviated. But again, the frequencies were more than adequate, and that’s what was most important.

Train nerd bonus: not only did our hotel room overlook the tracks in and out of Union Station:

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But also “Roundhouse Park,” home to old railcars and engines, the Toronto Railway Museum, and a brewery:

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And was within walking distance of many a shooting location, particularly this one for Orphan Black fans:

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Anyways, moral of the story is: great city, very good transit, very walkable, do go visit. They seem to have things figured out, and many of our cities could take a few lessons from.

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Where’s the Party at?

In yet another millennial thinkpiece, the New York Times holds forth on the decline of parties among young adults, both in hosting and attending. It should be clear, of course, that the millennials they’re talking about are the same as their definition of “New Yorkers,” but at least across that particular subset of the demographic there is indeed a trend, I believe. They attribute this to a few causes:

While the drop may be attributed mostly to the rigorous academic requirements needed to get into college nowadays and the revelry-stifling presence of helicopter parents, technological innovations are likely to be playing a role, too…

There are a number of obvious reasons the modern Internet may make parties an unpalatable option on a Saturday night compared to the pleasures of a screen. First, there’s the communal connection one may get without much emotional strain from social media, texting or instant messaging. The panoply of at-home entertainment options now immediately available renders quaint the impoverished selection at a 1990s Blockbuster. And if you’re looking for a new romantic partner, swiping for 10 minutes on Tinder may be more efficient than trekking an hour each way only to encounter the same people you always see.

Social media may have made it a snap to invite people to a gathering, but technological innovations have also made it easier for them to cancel.

These certainly ring somewhat true, but it can’t be the whole story. I think a friend’s tweet gets closer to the heart of the matter:

Somehow, despite rents going up, apartments grow smaller and smaller. The further you deviate from the detached single-family home, the harder it gets to host anyone. Full rowhouse -> the only large apartment above a restaurant -> basement rowhouse apartment -> apartment in a large mid-rise; that’s been my trajectory and it has gradually become the case where I can (and want to) host a gathering only a few times a year.

But what I think Ali’s tweet also gets at is that as we move around the city, we move farther apart physically. Take DC as an example: from cheap rents in the “recovering” central areas we spread afar to Petworth and H Street and Glover Park (and Crystal City, and Clarendon, and Silver Spring). No longer can we walk to our friends’ houses or easily hop a bus; now getting around requires an infrequent train to an even-less-frequent bus bus or a surging Uber/pricey taxi or some combination of modes that ends up being impractical for getting there and even worse when trying to leave.

And this has some real costs. At a time when cities across the world are actually responding to demands for more mobility with additional services like the Night Tube or the Grand Express, the American metropolis is instead failing to meet the challenge and is leaving behind its urban citizens. Beyond the immediate aggravations of poor transit service, these failings really do shrink the city to an immediately walkable area, with perhaps a few isolated pockets that you’ll visit or walk to on a regular basis, and the rest existing off the map – “thar be dragons here.”

For this generation that has to a large extent – and especially true of those who have chosen to live in cities – renounced the car, this is a poor state of affairs. If there’s anything at all we took away from D.A.R.E., it was “don’t drive drunk.” We never would, but more and more it’s gotten to the point where the option is either that or not going out at all.

Put bluntly, perhaps the reason for our fraying social connections is not the existence of the smartphone but rather the lack of ease with which we can meet to renew those connections in person. Why does America have to make it so difficult?

The Structural Underpinnings (and Failings) of WMATA

There are two main problems with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA): the structural/systemic, and the operational/day-to-day. The proposed solutions from all quarters are often at odds with each other – starve the authority into compliance, or dramatically increase funding, for instance – but that fact remains that both need to be addressed if Greater Washington’s transit system is ever going to achieve both a state of good repair and normal, safe operations as well as long-term planning and expansion (particularly in the area of core capacity).

It makes sense to try and break down the challenges at hand. This will be the first in a three-part series that explore the challenges and shortcomings of WMATA, and will focus on structural issues that make it difficult to improve from within. The second part will address the operational and day-to-day problems, and the third part will attempt to offer solutions and a way forward. Continue reading

We Are All Made of Wood

Todd St. John, better known as HunterGatherer, has begun a series called Subway Syntax exploring the everyday vagaries of underground rapid transit. While the New York influence is clear (e.g. the subway stop design), these animations reflect a universal experience. For example, “Screecher”:

“Screecher” — Individual who screeches to a halt without warning. They are unpredictable and oblivious, often staring down at their phone.

Come on, we’ve all known that guy (and/or walked into him). Other daily experiences include “Free Radical,” when there’s nothing left to hold on to; and “Subway Salmon,” a remarkably lifelike portrayal of navigating what appears to be the Red Line platform at Gallery Place.

Anyways, they’re cute and accurate, and if you’re not a dinosaur like me still into RSS feeds, you can also follow the Instagram here.

(Via The Fox is Black)

On Moving (On)

The life of a renter is one of constant loss. Contrary to the half-formed misconceptions that the tropes of “homeowners” and “long-time neighborhood fixtures” might hold, renters, like all humans, form deep bonds with the places in which they live. This applies, of course, not only to specific homes, but to the larger neighborhoods in which they inhabit. And much like no nation believes itself to be anything shy of “the greatest,” so too is it hard to imagine one’s neighborhood as anything other than home.

Even if it’s self-delusion – telling yourself “this isn’t so bad” while scouring Craigslist for the place you really dream of – it is the story we tell ourselves nonetheless. We immediately invest in a place – no matter how dead-end the suburb, if it isn’t worth living there, why even bother? But the magic, however heartfelt, is by necessity only temporary. It’s this ability to somehow move on, despite the pain it might cause them, that seems to give renters such a low reputation in the eyes of the “natives.” But all that changing address implies is some capacity to suppress emotion. We care about where we live in, and at no time is this clearer than when you return to a neighborhood you once lived in.

For me, the change was instantaneous. I moved on a Thursday, and on Friday I took a bus back to the old neighborhood. I already felt like a stranger. The light playing off these buildings that used to be “mine,” noticing how construction on that new building is proceeding and wondering what that will be like when it’s done, feeling like you are part of somewhere and better than all those other transients just passing through for an afternoon or a night out – none of these grip the heart and mind like they did not 24 hours ago.

Nothing drove that home clearer than walking out of the grocery store there, and rather than crossing the street to walk the two blocks back to an apartment no longer home to anyone, I walked to the bus stop to wait for a ride that would actually, finally, freshly bring me home.

Transport and Urban Design in the UAE

Dubai Marina at night, April 3, 2015.

Dubai Marina at night, April 3, 2015.

At the risk of this coming off like the introduction to a Tom Friedman column, I recently returned from a trip to the United Arab Emirates, thanks to Etihad honoring their Christmas mistake fares. It was totally worth it.

A lot has been written about Dubai and the UAE in general, but let me just echo the general idea that the whole place is a riotous cacophony of cultures and languages and buildings and architecture and food and smells and colors and it is by far the most global city I’ve ever encountered.

Actual transit is not especially comprehensive: there’s the two-line Dubai Metro, which is fully automated rapid transit, and the Dubai tram (a surface-running light rail line), as well as buses. Dubai faces some of the same transit problems as does a place like Los Angeles: overall density but geographically sprawling, with a long list of possible destinations to connect, and an environment clearly placing the car above all. There are plans for three further metro lines, as well as a national rail network, but those – especially the latter – remain in the planning stages.

In fact, the roads network of Dubai (and to a lesser extent, Abu Dhabi) is one of the more interesting – and crazy – designs I’ve ever encountered. In a city with no shortage of land or money, the logical extreme of road design has been reached. Few things outside of the older Bur Dubai and Deira neighborhoods actually front the street that their addresses indicate (street names and numbering being a whole separate issue); instead, shops and buildings feature frontage roads with parking and direct highway/road access.

Whereas in most of the rest of the world, two perpendicular roads intersecting would mean a single four-way signaled intersection, in Dubai it usually means two or three flyovers and an underpass. Here’s an example from Google Maps. Keep in mind that Sheikh Zayed Road is ostensibly a main street:

Intersection of Sheikh Zayed Road, 2nd of December Street, and Al Majlis Street, Dubai.

Intersection of Sheikh Zayed Road, 2nd of December Street, and Al Majlis Street, Dubai.

The alternative, of course, is a rare signaled four-way intersection, which features (among other things) an incredibly long light cycle. This is due in part to the fact that u-turns are actually designed as part of the road networks – all too often, you can’t get theah from heah – and this means that each of the four directions must have its own separately-signaled light phase. Take a look at this intersection, Al Maktoum Road and Omar Bin Al-Khattab in Deira, near the Union metro station:

Intersection of Al Maktoum Road and Omar Bin Al-Khattab Road in Deira, Dubai. April 3, 2015.

Intersection of Al Maktoum Road and Omar Bin Al-Khattab Road in Deira, Dubai. April 3, 2015.

Each roadway has its own right-turn slip lane. And each direction has its own green light, in turn, because at that point cars can proceed straight ahead, make a left turn, or make a u-turn; e.g., the cars in one set of lanes can head in any direction. Thus, if you’ve just missed the green, the wait is very long. I’ve never seen anything like it (and later on, as we tried to cross Al-Khattab…let’s just say slip lanes are not my favorite thing as a pedestrian). Furthermore, until that intersection, it’s difficult to cross Al Maktoum – this photograph was taken from a pedestrian bridge crossing the road.

To the left of that photo, you’d find the Union metro station, from which we were coming.

Dubai Union Station

Union station on the Dubai Metro. April 3, 2015

The design actually bears a slight resemblance to the Washington Metro’s canopy entrances, but on a much grander scale. Operationally, the Dubai Metro couldn’t be more different – the system is fully automated, equipped with platform edge doors, and seems to run 8-minute headways regularly (or at least, it was running 8-minute headways on a Friday, the UAE equivalent of Saturdays).

A Gold Class seat on the Dubai Metro. April 5, 2015

A Gold Class seat on the Dubai Metro. April 5, 2015

It also features a class system – the first car of every five car train is split into half, with “Gold Class” in the front and a women and children’s half behind that. Of course, we had to try Gold Class. From what I could tell, the main difference is that it is significantly less crowded. Also, it has tray tables. It’s also a fairly paltry price difference (at least by Western standards). A two-zone, one-way Gold Class fare is AED 9.00, as opposed to a standard ticket for AED 4.50 – so twice as much – but in US dollars that’s $2.45 as opposed to $1.23. I also lost my card somewhere on that five-stop ride [update: finally found it after doing laundry], so had to pay an exit penalty of AED 10. In total, my one-way trip in Gold Class cost about $5. Our first day in Dubai we’d bought a one-day pass (in standard class) for AED 22 each, or $5.99.

The other nice thing about Gold Class is that it’s the front of the first car, so with the train being automated (and thus having no driver’s cab), you get a pretty neat view of the train running through the system.

Riding in style on the Dubai Metro Gold Class #dxb #trainvideos #transitnerd

A post shared by Graham Jenkins (@thelastgoliath) on

While we didn’t ride the buses at all in Dubai (or Abu Dhabi), the one thing we noticed is that the stops are not only fully enclosed, but fully air conditioned. (I forgot to take a picture so here’s one from elsewhere.) However, frequency seems to be an issue, as does traffic. In general, surface travel in the UAE can be difficult, but with taxis as inexpensive as they were – and the walk to the Metro as hot as it was – we took them to most places. We even took a cab from Dubai to Abu Dhabi, not just because there are few other options, but because the journey of roughly 120km/45 minutes – or DC to Baltimore – cost the equivalent of around $75.

In Abu Dhabi, there’s no rail to speak of and the only transit available are buses. From what I’ve heard, they run very infrequently, and based on the rarity with which I even saw one on the streets, I’d have to agree with that. The streets are on a bit more of a grid in Dubai, but only on a macro scale – the city was divided into superblocks with sort of elaborate loops and cul-de-sacs of smaller streets within.

View of an especially distinct Abu Dhabi building taken from the interior roads of a superblock. April 6, 2015

View of an especially distinct Abu Dhabi building taken from the interior roads of a superblock. April 6, 2015

Almost all streets also featured parking, and they separated little islands of tall buildings from one another. In some places, buildings were separated by pedestrian plazas and in a few cases were even surrounded by them. And virtually every building in both Abu Dhabi and Dubai featured ground level retail – if ever there were proof that parking doesn’t make a business, this is it.

Pedestrian spaces between buildings and ground-floor retail, Abu Dhabi. April 6, 2015.

Pedestrian spaces between buildings and ground-floor retail, Abu Dhabi. April 6, 2015.

In terms of the built environment, the UAE is unlike anywhere I’ve ever been before. If there are any lessons to draw on for the US here, it’s that merely glomming transit onto an existing network isn’t a catch-all solution. The built environment matters much more. And Dubai and Abu Dhabi’s continuing functionality is probably due in no small part to the relative absence of single-use buildings and areas. Everything may be an island, but those islands have enough in them to discourage some number of unnecessary vehicle trips. It’s a lesson we’d do well to take to heart. And that fact that this all exists despite Abu Dhabi’s adoption of AASHTO terminology and concepts like LOS is a testament to…something.

But overall, the UAE was a truly fantastic experience and I recommend viewing this monument to late-stage hypercapitalism and carcentricity at some point while you still can.

What’s the Point of the Authority?: A WMATA Panel recap

Yesterday I had the great pleasure of participating in the National Press Club’s panel on the future of WMATA. Many thanks to Pat Host for, well, hosting, and to my fellow panelists: David Alpert, of Greater Greater Washington; ATU 689’s Jackie Jeter, and WMATA Board member Tom Bulger. Audio is available, as you can see above.

David’s written a recap of his own, available here. While he presented his thoughts initially as a statement, I had come up with a bunch of talking points which to some extent got thrown by the wayside. I wanted to prose-ify at least my introduction and present it here for you.

But first, the long and short of the event is that I came away with more respect for the union than I had before, and even less for the board. “We’re only as good as our last rush hour,” emphasized Tom Bulger, “and I’m sorry, but that’s just the way it is.”

This kind of captive, passive mindset is perfectly indicative of the lack of initiative the board has shown in addressing the actual day-to-day needs of riders and users of rail and bus alike. The Washington area is no longer composed of white 9-5ers coming into the core by 9am and departing at 5pm sharp (with buses, of course, reserved for the predominantly black locals). It’s a multicultural, multi-industry, diverse region with varying wants and needs. The better-suited WMATA is to move people between the hours of 10am and 4pm, and after 7pm, and on weekends, the more people will flock to the system. But there’s a serious lack of urgency or will to hold WMATA to any kind of improved standard.

With that said, here’s the general thrust of what I was trying to convey at the beginning:

The core mission of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority is to provide transit service and move people. And when we start shifting the mission to that of some sort of solely fiscal entity – e.g., the job of WMATA is to pay back its bonds and not spend too much money – we lose of sight of the whole point of running a transit system. A public authority’s duty is to the citizens it serves, not financial stakeholders. Thus, to see Muriel Bowser appointing a “fiscal guy” like Corbett Price to the board – a board where few members have any real transit experience – is yet another step in the wrong direction. Focusing on financial management will, no mistake about it, come at the expense of operations, and to further impoverish the latter is both wrongheaded and an all-too-recognizable continuation of what’s gotten WMATA into its current situation.

If I had to sum up both the single greatest immediate concern with WMATA, as well as what it means in a larger sense, it would have to be frequency. Put simply, there aren’t enough trains or buses running. Frequency is what enables us to live without cars; to take a train or bus to dinner or work or an event without worrying about waiting half an hour for one to get back. It replicates the ability of the car to begin your journey when you wish, rather than being forced into a rigid timetable. And frankly speaking, running 3 trains per hour on weekends is a tremendous waste of the infrastructure we already have.

Frequency is the best predictor – and motivator – of transit ridership. If you run it, they will come. And it is WMATA’s refusal to consider frequency and headways outside of peak, “rush hour” service that is most concerning, as the board and executive management seem not to understand that people have a need for mobility at all hours of the day. Whether through boredom or ignorance or misplaced priorities, the actual experience of riding Metrorail and Metrobus bears little relation to what WMATA’s stakeholders seem to imagine. And if they cannot grasp WMATA’s current inadequacies on this single front – frequency, a basic tenet of good transit service – then what hopes can we have of addressing the rest?

Upcoming Event: Future of WMATA Panel

I’ve been asked to participate in a panel that Pat Host and the National Press Club are putting together for later this month. I’ll be there in my capacity is a “mass transit enthusiast” and erstwhile commentator here and on Twitter. Our favorite local transit agency is definitely at a crossroads, and in serious need of both reinvestment and reform. How best to get there?

It’s a pretty exciting chance to ask and answer some questions in-person, without the usual filters in place. I’ll do my best to represent the riding public – we all seem to share a number of concerns that are rarely, if ever, addressed by Metro’s leadership or local elected officials.

It’s on-the-record and open to the public on Monday, March 23rd – see you there, maybe?

WASHINGTON, March 13, 2015—Major stakeholders of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA, or Metro) will discuss the future of the system in a panel discussion at the National Press Club in downtown Washington on Monday, March 23, from 10-11:30 a.m. EST.

The United States’ second busiest system by daily passengers is at a critical point in its history as it faces growing safety concerns and fares, declining ridership and a budget squeeze. In an on-the-record, moderated Q&A format, stakeholders will discuss operational, budgetary, governance and management issues.

Participants are:

  • Pat Host, moderator
    National Press Club member and reporter for Defense Daily and Rotor & Wing.
  • Tom Bulger
    WMATA Board Member, Alternate Director for the District of Columbia; board member since July 2011.
  • Jackie Jeter
    President of WMATA union Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 689.
  • David Alpert
    Editor and Founder of transit news source Greater Greater Washington, available at greatergreaterwashington.org.
  • Graham Jenkins
    WMATA rider, District resident, and mass transit enthusiast blogging at lowheadways.wordpress.com.
The event will start promptly at 10 am EST and will take place in the Zenger Room, located adjacent to the Fourth Estate Restaurant. The National Press Club is located at 529 14th St. NW (at F St.), on the 13th floor, and is accessible from Metrorail via McPherson Square (OR/BL/SV) and Metro Center (OR/BL/SV/RD) and multiple bus routes including the 52, 54 and 30s line.

Setting Priorities; Fixing Blame

It’s no secret that WMATA is in serious trouble. We’ve become a cautionary tale for cities across the country:

And Ben Kabak writes:

Passengers are not comforted by statistics. Metro needs to realize a new culture without enough fiscal or political support. Here, in New York, the MTA is working to do something similar, but they don’t have nearly the same track record of mistakes to overcome. If we aren’t careful, though, DC serves as a lesson. It’s New York’s dystopian transit future if no one takes care of the system.

There is no doubt that Metro is facing something of a perfect storm right now: chronic underinvestment couple with endemic mismanagement have led to a region-wide shortage of confidence in all transit whatsoever (fairly or unfairly). DC’s streetcar network is in serious jeopardy, the Purple Line in Maryland is on the chopping block, and there’s little political appetite, it seems, to think big.

Which, of course, puts off actually solving the many problems with WMATA, in particular. These boil down to two key points, both of which are inescapable, and yet which have somehow pitted the region’s heartiest transit advocates and loudest critics against each other. WMATA receives inadequate funding. WMATA needs wholesale organizational reform. These are both entirely true. Continue reading

Late to the Party: Transit and the Fourth Estate

I’ve been plowing my way through Robert Caro’s The Power Broker since, embarrassingly, last July*, and as I hit the home stretch, finally the press of New York seems to have awakened to the disasters wrought by a wholly unaccountable Robert Moses on the city. Throughout much of Moses’s tenure, only the New York Post (astonishingly, once a bastion of populism and hard-hitting investigative journalism) seems to have been interested in the misdoings of Moses, and was the only outlet to even try and report the story of East Tremont’s destruction for the construction of the Cross-Bronx Expressway.

It isn’t until later, when the patronage and corruption associated with Moses’s “Slum Clearance Committee” and his oversight of Title I Housing redevelopment starts to emerge that the rest of the press picks up this whiff of something unsavory. Moses, you see, had cultivated the press – feting publishers and senior editors, enlisting officials and loyal “Moses men” to do battle on his behalf – and was able to, for decades, portray himself as an incorruptible savior of the public interest. For a time, the publishers are reluctant to confront their own mistaken judgment of Moses’s character. But as Gene Gleason and Fred Cook of the World-Telegram began to cover the story, eventually trading scoops and leads with erstwhile competitor William Haddad at the Post, soon the third afternoon paper, the Journal-American, joined in, and was followed by the Herald Tribune and even the Times, sending the coverage to new heights of “respectability.”

Obviously, this has little to do with transit directly. But it speaks to the importance of digging, to questioning the narrative, to actually refusing to accept the pat answers from the authority or or the man in charge, to expressing just the slightest bit of doubt at the rote replies from flacks and PR men. For the health of a city, an inquisitive press is a requirement. And often that will mean an adversarial press, regardless of the”access” it might cost (and when current access consists predominantly of regurgitating agency-issued press releases, there isn’t much to lose).

Now, contrast that spirit with the lugubrious malaise of Robert Thompson, the Washington Post‘s so-called “Dr. Gridlock.” Virtually his every column or live Q&A session that touches on issues of transit and WMATA is written with an air of resignation, of a man who sees no possibilities other than current reality and is uninterested in even hinting at the possibility of something else. In response to a question/complaint about long wait times on the ludicrously poorly-timetabled Blue Line (12 minute peak headways), here is his “answer”:

DrGAnswer

We can boil that down to: “delays are bad. It’s cold outside, too.” Some real ace reporting, there.

And of course, were there other options, it would be a different story. Even an otherwise odious outlet, like the Washington Examiner, can feature top-notch reporting from gems like Kytja Weir. But when that paper axes its local coverage entirely, there are few places to turn to. The Washington Times‘s big feature story of the past few years was a three-part exposé on the inner workings of WMATA’s “culture of complacence,” but its relentless focus on race above all present the whole story in a weird, quasi-racist tone. There are important facts they’ve discovered, but things like managerial incompetence seems outweighed by the fact that said manager is black.

In other words, press, elected officials, and aloof authority personnel have conspired – presumably unwittingly – to render the status quo the only possible state of affairs. Long-term planning for the future on anything resembling the Second System or the first 105 miles of planned WMATA Metrorail – all of which were built – is absent. The current situation is accepted as the only one. Relatively loud voices that could be a clarion call for improvement are absence. Dr. Gridlock tells us, essentially, to “get used to it.” And it’s here where Caro’s writing on the dismal state of transit (specifically, the Long Island Rail Road) at the time bears an unwelcome resemblance to today:

“Get used to it!” Accept as part of your daily existence two or three – or more – hours sitting amid dirt, crammed against strangers, breathing foul air, sweating in summer, shivering in winter … “Get used to it!” One has to think about what those words, so casually uttered, really mean. One has to realize that a man uttering those words has accepted discomfort and exhaustion as a part – a substantial part – of the fabric of his life. Accepted them so completely that he no longer really thinks about them – or about the amount of his life of which they are, day by day, robbing him. We learn to tolerate intolerable conditions. The numbness that is the defense against intolerable pain has set in – so firmly that many of the victims no longer realize that the pain is pain.

“Get used to it,” indeed. Dr. Gridlock and the rest of the Washington-area media aren’t responsible for the decline of WMATA, but they’ve done little to arrest its fall. Of course, part of the problem plaguing local coverage of transit issues is the fact that so many journalists drive, just as with the politicians who have allowed mass transit to atrophy. And that windshield perspective has led to a great collective ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

In any event, without a press willing to antagonize and question the dominant narratives put forth by WMATA (an unaccountable public authority, as Caro might emphasize), their word will remain gospel truth, even when hundreds of thousands of daily riders experience otherwise. Who will step up to the challenge?

*Here’s my defense: it’s relentlessly depressing. Not that this makes it anything less than utterly worthwhile, but coupled with the deluge of bad news that seems to comprise the world, it hasn’t made for the best escapist pursuit before bed. It’s telling that I read approximately 4 times as many novels in 2014 as I did non-fiction books.